Invest Realty Group | Nashua Real Estate, Merrimack Real Estate, Hollis Real Estate


Buying property can be fun, but it can also be exhausting. You want to find a place that fits your personal lifestyle and invest in a home that'll bring you years of happiness. As you're looking at shorefront real estate:

1. Understand Your Access Rights to the Water

On the surface, it may look like a no-brainer that you have access to the water, but many people learn the hard way that their beautiful waterfront views don't have easements that allow access to the lake, pond, or ocean. Most people don't want a beautiful view of the water without being able to use it.

2. Know Your Waterfront Buffer Zones

State and local regulations may prohibit your landscaping plans from making forward progress if you're too close to tidal waters. Know the buffer zones before you buy so you're not stuck with a landscape you don't love.

3. Learn Your Littoral Rights

If you purchase waterfront real estate, you may very well be granted littoral rights—that is, you'd have unrestricted rights to use that water as though it was land. The government may also own the water up to a certain point, so it's best to gain this knowledge up front.

4. Know if You have Riparian Rights

If you purchase a non-riparian waterfront property, you likely won't be able to have a private dock or pier on the water. Since this is one of the major reasons people want to own waterfront property, it's important to understand these rights before you buy.

5. Understand Your Obligations Regarding Water Depth

You don't have any control over Mother Nature, but you do often have certain obligations in terms of what you're permitted to do in certain water depths. You may need to build a deck farther out into the water than you'd first anticipated in order adhere to depth regulations.

6. Look at the Fixtures Surrounding the Property

Certain watercraft, such as sailboats, need far more clearance than others. If your potential property is directly next to fixed-height bridges that wouldn't enable you to enjoy leisure time on your sailboat, that may not be the best home for you. Alternatively, people who enjoy kayaking wouldn't need to be concerned with fixed-height structures. In fact, those areas might be best for this type of buyer.

7. Research Regulations Impacting Docks and Piers

It's not atypical to have to purchase pier permits. Depending on your location, these regulations may be governed by federal, state, or local institutions. It's best to have an idea of the cost before you get your heart set on a single property.

8. Include Flood Insurance in Your Monthly Costs

Natural disasters can bolster the cost of flood insurance. Even if you think you'll never need it, a waterfront property is always best protected when flood insurance is calculated into the cost.

9. Know How Secluded You Really Want to Be

Waterfront real estate is appealing because it's quiet and serene, but if this will be your year-round residence, make sure you've taken winter into consideration if you're looking for lakefront property where snowfall can change the landscape quickly. Super-secluded spots can make it difficult to get to the store when blizzards hit, so you may want to look for a place that has easy access to shopping. However, if you're willing to rough it, or if you'll only be using the property in the summer, seclusion is a great way to go! Of course, if you're looking for beachfront property in Florida, parts of California or the Carolinas, winters won't really be a concern you'll have to worry about.

10. Explore the Pros and Cons of Private Beaches Versus Public Shores

There are pros and cons to each. Make sure you have an idea what you're looking for before you and your real estate agent start house-hunting, but be open to possibilities if your real estate agent has a property they insist you must see.

As you're shopping for waterfront real estate, be sure to keep these tips in mind. The more you know, the more likely you'll be to find a home that makes you happy for many years to come. Contact me if you have questions about buying waterfront property!


Before you kick off a home search, it is important to differentiate an ordinary house from a dream residence. That way, you can set realistic goals for your home search and accelerate the process of acquiring a house that matches your expectations.

Ultimately, each homebuyer's definition of a dream home varies. But for homebuyers who want to streamline the search for a dream home, there are several home factors to consider, and these include:

1. The Age and Condition of a Home

Dedicate the necessary time and resources to learn about a home's age and condition – you'll be glad you did. With these home insights, you can determine whether a home will require substantial repairs in the immediate future.

To evaluate a house's age and condition, you should hire a home inspector. This professional will examine a residence both inside and out and search for any structural problems with the property. Then, the home inspector will provide a detailed report that outlines any home issues.

A home inspection offers a valuable learning opportunity, one that can help you determine if a house is right for you. And if a home inspection reveals your dream home is actually a dud, you can always rescind a home offer and reenter the housing market.

2. A Home's Price

Many people want to own large, extravagant mansions. Yet the costs of these properties can be prohibitive, which is why most homebuyers search for houses that fall within a specific price range.

As you prepare to search for your dream home, you should get pre-approved for a mortgage. This will enable you to enter the housing market with a budget in hand and avoid the temptation to spend too much on a house.

Also, it is important to realize that no home is perfect. Although you may search far and wide for a dream house that has all the amenities and features that you want, you'll likely need to make trade-offs to find your ideal residence.

Creating a list of must-haves and wants for your dream home usually is a great idea. This list will enable you to narrow your home search, evaluate properties that fall within your price range and discover your dream home faster than ever before.

3. A Home's Location

Consider where you want to live before you launch a home search. By doing so, you can identify available houses in certain cities and towns and map out your home search accordingly.

Think about what's important to you in terms of home location. For example, if you want a home that's close to your office in the city, you may want to search for residences in or near the city itself. Or, if you want to live close to the beach, you can explore properties that are conveniently nestled along the beachfront.

Lastly, if you need help finding your dream home, you should hire a real estate agent. With a real estate agent at your side, you should have no trouble making your homeownership dreams come true.


This Single-Family in Lowell, MA recently sold for $425,100. This Cape style home was sold by Invest Realty Group - Invest Realty Group.


27 Trotting Park Rd, Lowell, MA 01854

Single-Family

$439,900
Price
$425,100
Sale Price

7
Rooms
3
Beds
3/1
Full/Half Baths
HUGE PRICE IMPROVEMENT! Gorgeous Single Family Home with a home-office or a possible in-law unit. You will fall in love with this gorgeous Pawtucketville home the moment you walk in. Home was built in 2004, features an amazing layout and is super energy efficient. Be welcomed by a grand entry featuring an open staircase with cathedral ceilings. The first floor features a very large kitchen with a custom made island with tons of cabinet space, a formal dining room, a bright living room, a bath and laundry. The second floor features a spacious master bedroom with a walk in closet, a master bath with separate shower and Jacuzzi tub, two additional large bedrooms and a family full bathroom. The walk out basement has been finished to impress, it would be a great in-law unit, home-office or grand family room. Walking distance to Lowell-Dracut-Tyngsborough State Forest featuring hiking trails & fishing ponds, close to Mass General Hospital and easy access to highways- Come and Fall in love!

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Have you ever walked into a room and wondered, "What is that smell?” Perhaps it's the kitchen trash, or maybe a clogged drain or the moldy-smelling washing machine. No matter what might be giving off that foul odor, there are tricks that you can use to bring a halt to it.

Here are simple tricks to seek and remove any awful smells coming from your home.

1. Track it down

When it comes to smells, the sources could be numerous. The first step would be to find out where the stench is coming from, and bring it to an end. Check the places the smell could be emanating from such as your kitchen sink, the trashcan, the bathroom or even an accent rug. It could also be mold or mildew in the crevice of the tub or the lip of the fridge, or an animal carcass in the dryer vent or chimney. Once you have located the source, determine if you'll need to disinfect the area or if you'll simply need to throw away the cause of the smell.


2. Sewer smells

Sewer smells in the basement is one of the worst and concerning smells that could infiltrate your home. Is it a result of trapped water under a floor drain, or perhaps a clogged drain or a cracked sewer line? No matter the cause, it is imperative to find the source of the odor as soon as possible as leaving it unchecked could result in loss of your home's value. As soon as you discover what the problem is, fix it immediately to avoid any potential property value decreases or possible health issues that could arise from any substance residing within the sewage or trapped water.Some circumstances may require the assistance of a professional plumber or cleaner to take care of the issue. Be sure to get the appropriate estimates needed to correct the problem and clean away residue from areas that may have been affected.


3. Carpet and rug odors

Most of the time, homeowners keep looking for the source of that annoying house smell, forgetting to pay attention to the very thing beneath them – the carpet or rug. But often times, a simple cleaning will correct the issue of an over-trafficked carpet or rug. While vacuuming may get rid of the immediate dirt, you may need to delve a little deeper and steam or wash it. You could clean with a mixture of one part white vinegar and three parts water to remove the smell. You may opt to put it in your carpet cleaner and deep clean the rugs or simply spot treat a particular area. Either way, a homemade mixture or store-bought one can do wonders for your home's scent.


4. Food smell

Most of the time, cooking smells can get trapped in your kitchen, especially if you have a diverse menu of heavily spiced produce and proteins. A great way to remove the smell of these dishes from your kitchen and home is to wipe down the cabinets, interior and exterior, to get rid of any food residue or scents that may be trapped on or inside the cabinets. You may also want to consider removing any food waste after enjoying the dishes or if there are any raw components left over once you're done cooking.

Perhaps you may be worried that you might be too accustomed to possible weird smells in your home to know when one creeps up. Ask your real estate agent or staging professional to do a walkthrough of your home and get a second opinion. Once you’ve solved any deterring smell issues, create good scents to entice your buyers. Your agent will know what works best for buyers in your area, from cedar to baking bread.


If you ride through the suburbs of America, you’ll likely notice that the houses just seem to get bigger and bigger. Like our taste for large trucks and SUVs, Americans tend towards the idea that bigger is better.

On the opposite end of the spectrum are people who feel quite the opposite. From this minimalist mindset has emerged the “tiny house.” What exactly is a tiny house?

There is no exact definition. However, most tiny houses are built on wheels--to adhere to local building code--and typically don’t exceed 500 square feet in size.

You might be thinking that’s a bit extreme. And you wouldn’t be alone--Americans have taken advantage of small homes in the form of modular homes, and cottage-style houses for decades.

With the cost of heating and powering a home rising year after year, it’s beginning to make sense to downsize.

So, in this article we’ll talk about what it means to live in a smaller home to help you decide whether it’s a good choice for you.

Barriers to building small houses

If it’s your dream to someday build a small house on a hilltop in your hometown, you might have to face-off with the local zoning committee first. Some of the biggest barriers to building smaller houses are local regulations involving minimum house sizes.

This isn’t a new problem, with towns struggling with the idea of minimum square footage as far back as the 1970s. In spite of this barrier, small house and tiny house proponents have been finding loopholes.

One such workaround involves simply building your house on wheels. However, that isn’t easy to do and it doesn’t always look great either.

Living simply

Depending on your hobbies and philosophy, living in a small house can be a good or a bad thing. Those who seek to become more minimal in their belongings often find that small houses help them achieve this.

The more things we own the more we have to worry about storing and maintaining them. However, if you value experiences more than objects, living in a small house could save you money and therefore leave you with more funds for traveling and other experiences.

Family is another thing to consider when living in a small house. If you have a large family or pets, living in a small house can be difficult. However, there is something to be said about growing up in a small house (it makes it harder for kids to avoid their parents by playing video games in their room or the basement!).

How to decide if you can manage living in a small house

If you’re downsizing from a larger home it can be scary to lose all of that extra space you were used to. There are a few ways to see if you can adapt to a smaller home, however.

You could rent a small apartment while you search for a new home. This will allow you to acclimate yourself to living in a smaller environment.

If you don’t want to go through the trouble of signing a lease, there’s always renting a small property through AirBnB or a camping cottage for a few weeks. Then you’ll have time to notice what you like and dislike about the smaller space and will be able to plan for how to want to deal with those changes if you decide to move into a smaller house.




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